Tag Archives: Car Culture

Share the Road – Three ways to make traveling safer for everyone.

As a cyclist, I’m constantly amazed at the poor behavior and bad judgment displayed by many drivers. Chances are, if you’re reading this, you’re not one of these drivers, and for that I thank you. Despite my time spent walking on glaciers and hanging on the sides of rock walls, nothing in my life is scarier or makes me feel more vulnerable than riding my bike on a busy road.   The number one reason most commuters don’t cycle is because of safety. Sharing doesn’t even begin to express the experience of what it’s like to occupy the same space as an object twenty times my size, moving over four times as fast. If you’re a recreational cyclist, a commuter, or a sometime tourist, most likely you know what I mean. Whether you’re pedaling a bicycle or piloting an automobile, it’s clear that the playing field is not even. The next time you who find yourself behind the wheel or in the passenger seat, remember these three simple ways to help open the roads and make traveling a safer experience for everyone. Continue reading

Year of the Bike

For those of you that missed it, 2013 was Salt Lake City’s Year of the Bike.  Personally, a claim like that brings to mind the far reaching social and infrastructural changes required to undermine urban motorized transportation, make cycling the primary mode of personal transportation, and take a big step towards ending the air pollution or “inversion” that has become a near constant threat to the health of SLC’s Residents.  Laws prohibiting single occupancy vehicles, expanded bike lanes and trails, economic incentives for cycling… Basically shutting down all vehicular traffic inside city limits except for trucks, buses and trains is pretty much what I have in mind when I think of a city giving over an entire year for the advocacy and awareness of bicycling.  Claiming anything as “Year of” should mean it’s influence is far greater than any other social or political force.  Think, Year of the Axe Murdering Homeless Man, or, Year of the West Valley City Gonorrhea Infection.  Although those might be titles you’d affix after the point, they pretty well capture what has happened.  So looking back on the last year, it’s hard to notice any real changes in Salt Lake’s transportation hierarchy.  Although I’m not a resident of SLC, and my time spent there usually amounts to a few weeks in the spring and fall, from my perch atop Little Cottonwood Canyon it’s easy to look down and see the murky, poisonous soup, and know damn well that it’s not a bunch of cyclists that’ve caused it.  But while SLC didn’t under go any major cycling-themed transformations, they’ve still managed to put together a few initiatives worth mentioning.  Also, in honor and celebration of the year gone by, I’ve dumped a bunch of pictures and captions in the following post that wrap up our bike-powered adventures in and around SLC this fall.  

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The Air We Breathe

“By now the revolution has deprived the mass of consumers of any independent access to the staples of life; clothing, shelter, food, even water.  Air remains the only necessity that the average user can still get for himself, and the revolution has imposed a heavy tax on that by way of pollution.”

 

Every winter the air around Salt Lake City Utah gains national attention for being some of the worst.  It’s unique geography, dense population, and numerous industries often trap air between mountain ranges, creating a thick, foggy soup of air that can often be the worst in the Nation. As residents once again protest the quality of their air and argue that breathing clean air is a right that we can’t be denied, I have to wonder, what’s exactly making this air so unhealthy, and whatever it is why can’t we just turn if off?  What could possibly be worth our lives, poisoning our air and killing ourselves?

 

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